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Owners Again Borrowing against Homes as Market Recovers

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By E. Scott Reckard and Andrew Khouri

(MCT)—Retired aerospace engineer Owen Klasen was rejected last year when he sought a second mortgage to paint and re-roof his house.

Home prices hadn’t risen enough, the loan officer told him.

But last month, the same loan officer offered him more than double the credit he needed.

“I told him I needed $25,000” on a home equity line of credit, says Klasen, who lives in Fillmore, Calif. “He says we were qualified to go up to $60,000.”

Klasen is among a wave of homeowners nationally who are again putting their homes in hock — despite the costly lessons of the housing meltdown.

After a home equity credit binge during the housing bubble, banks shut off the tap as home prices plummeted. Sobered homeowners stopped viewing equity as free money for cars, vacations and college educations.

But now second mortgages are back in vogue. Bank of America, for instance, saw its home equity business surge 75 percent last year compared with 2012, says Matthew Potere, who oversees home equity lending for the Charlotte, N.C., giant. In the fourth quarter, Bank of America issued $1.9 billion in new home equity credit lines, up from $1 billion a year earlier.

The most popular use of equity lines is home improvement, followed by debt consolidation, says Kelly Kockos, Wells Fargo’s senior vice president of home equity. But some borrowers are using the credit to double down on real estate, a popular move during the housing bubble.

Adam and Kimberly Smith work at high-tech firms in San Francisco, where prices skyrocketed last year. They recently obtained a credit line on their two-bedroom North Beach condominium. The couple, in their early 30s, plan to rent out the condo and buy a home in the high-end East Bay suburbs.

Three-bedroom homes there start at $1 million. Borrowing $50,000 to $100,000, combined with their savings, will give them a 20 percent down payment on the suburban home they crave.

“We know we can make an offer this weekend,” Adam Smith says.

Home equity lines of credit are a type of variable-rate second mortgage. They enable homeowners to borrow up to a pre-defined amount at their discretion.

A homeowner with a $200,000 first mortgage on a $400,000 house, for instance, might take out a $100,000 line of credit. If the homeowner borrowed the maximum, the mortgage debt would total $300,000—75 percent of what the house would bring in a sale.

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