Welcome!




Expand Your Education with These Courses from
Business Creation - Prospecting: Skills for Sales Success: Part Three.
A Consumer Advocate Approach to Real Estate & Mortgages: Courses 1 & 2.
At Home with Diversity.
Bundle 1: CIPS Core Course (US Version).
Bundle 3: CIPS Institute (Non-US Version).

Is ‘Good’ Credit the Best Your Clients Can Do?

Have a comment on this article? Share on Facebook!

By Mary Umberger

RISMEDIA, March 2009-(MCT)-”Good” credit is not a black-and-white matter these days. To mortgage financiers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, there’s good credit, better credit and best credit.

That’s because about a year ago Fannie and Freddie added grades of risk to people’s credit scores, which means they will add fees to the mortgages they buy in the secondary market, in order to mark them clearly for perceived risk. Those risk grades can make a loan significantly more expensive.

A score higher than 740 gets the best rates, according to Rich Bira, branch manager of FCM Direct Lender in Chicago.

“A score between 720 and 739 gets .125 percent added to the rate, a score between 700 and 719 gets .375 percent added to the rate, and a score between 680 and 699 gets .5 percent added to the rate,” he said.

Bira said he recently counseled a couple who had a combined 691 credit score, which pushed up the price of their loan, even though in many ways they would be considered “good” borrowers.

The clients had paid their bills on time, but their score was dragged down somewhat because they don’t have a long credit history and because they didn’t have multiple lines of credit.

“You have to keep in mind that in order to have high credit scores, you have to show that you have credit available to you and that you use it wisely,” Bira told them.

So, even though the clients had nominally qualified for a 5 percent loan at that time, because of the fees, they’d have an additional .5 percent added to their rate, making their loan too pricey.

He advised them on how to raise their scores in the coming months and to hope the rates will still be low when their scores improve.

© 2009, Chicago Tribune.
Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

Want instant access to great articles like this for your blog or newsletter? Check out our 30-day FREE trial of REsource Licensed Real Estate Content Solutions. Need easy stay-in-touch e-Marketing solutions too? Try Pop-a-Note for 99 cents!
Join RISMedia on Twitter and Facebook to connect with us and share your thoughts on this and other topics.




Copyright© 2014 RISMedia, The Leader in Real Estate Information Systems and Real Estate News. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be republished without permission from RISMedia.

Content on this website is copyrighted and may not be redistributed without express written permission from RISMedia. Access to RISMedia archives and thousands of articles like this, as well as consumer real estate videos, are available through RISMedia's REsource Licensed Content Solutions. Offering the industry’s most comprehensive and affordable content packages. Click here to learn more! http://resource.rismedia.com

Our Latest News >>